Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Pasanda

US plans

32 posts in this topic

I posted about this in another thread, but just to update on firmed-up developments...

  • Flying to Orlando on the 6th July via Thomas Cook - not expecting to be treated like royalty. As long as we're sat together, fed and watered, we'll be happy.
  • Picking up a rental at the airport, from Budget rentals. Again, we're not fussy on the car type. As long as there's room and AC, and there is. 
  • We have a villa booked at this place in Kissimee from the 6th to the 23rd July: http://www.clcworldflorida.com/regal-oaks/
  • We haven't booked any resort tickets yet, but are looking at Universal, Disney, Discovery Cove, and if possible, Kennedy and Legoland.
  • We are also driving to a place called Venice Beach in Florida, which i know very little about, but my friend tells me you are guaranteed to find both recent and petrified sharks teeth along the beach.
  • On the 23th we're flying from Orlando to Kennedy Airport, NYC via Delta.
  • We're staying at the Hilton Doubletree Metropolitan, from the 23rd July to the 31st, here: http://doubletree3.hilton.com/en/hotels/new-york/doubletree-by-hilton-hotel-metropolitan-new-york-city-NYCDTDT/index.html
  • Whilst in NYC, the only thing we've booked is the Empire State Tour, as it was on offer on Black Friday :)
  • On the 31st, we fly home to London Gatwick via Norwegian Air. 

 

For me, this sort of trip is stressful. It's all about minimising the number of issues we'll face. But assuming that we will face some. It's not the relaxing holiday I would prefer, but we face a perfect storm of having a child at the right age, and enough bucks to pay for it (which won't last long). My wife is not great at taking responsibility for stuff like this. So most of the work organising tends to land on my shoulders. Or perhaps i accept it too easily, who knows.

Looking back, i know it will have been a great trip, that my Son will remember forever.

I'll send you all a postcard.

 

Edited by Pasanda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/29/2017 at 7:49 AM, Pasanda said:
  • Picking up a rental at the airport, from Budget rentals. Again, we're not fussy on the car type. As long as there's room and AC, and there is. 

Have you ever driven in the US?

How difficult is it to get used to driving on the other side of the road?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Several times. Takes about 10 mins to get used to. Then you have to remember to re-focus again when you wake up the next morning.

The hardest things to get used to are usually the different road rules: IIRC you guys allow cars to turn right even when the lights are on red, or summat like that right? Similarly, on the continent they have roundabouts like we do in the UKt, but on the continent they give way to cars coming onto the roundabout, which is the opposite in the UK. Stuff like that can be challenging. I don't recall seeing a roundabout in the US, when i was last driving there.

The mechanics of LH drive are fine though. If you reach left for the shift, you hit a door and correct yourself. No problem

Edited by Pasanda
ChuckWagonMTG likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pasanda said:

The mechanics of LH drive are fine though. If you reach left for the shift, you hit a door and correct yourself. No problem

I didnt even think of a manual car.  wow.

Are the pedals reversed?  Or is gas on the right with break left?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Dunnar said:

Are the pedals reversed?  Or is gas on the right with break left?

LOL 'Mericans. The pedals are the same.

Having driven in the UK, you get accustomed to it quickly. Except at some hectic T-sections. One moment of negligence and you turn onto the wrong lane.

Roundabouts can be hairy too. "Look right, look right, look right."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Pasanda said:

The hardest things to get used to are usually the different road rules: IIRC you guys allow cars to turn right even when the lights are on red, or summat like that right? Similarly, on the continent they have roundabouts like we do in the UKt, but on the continent they give way to cars coming onto the roundabout, which is the opposite in the UK. Stuff like that can be challenging. I don't recall seeing a roundabout in the US, when i was last driving there.

It's location specific, but the rule of thumb is "right on red after stop, and yield to oncoming traffic". Some signalized intersections may have a red ball and a green arrow which means stop for through traffic and "no need to stop" for turning in the arrow direction. Little known is the left-on-red rule, which allows a left turn at a red light (similar to the right-on-red rule) but only if you're on a one-way street and turning onto a one-way street. The left-on-red rule may be a state-specific allowance ... I'm not 100% positive on this one.

Roundabouts are currently in vogue with roadway safety experts and have sprung up like weeds here in the states. I understand their benefits well, but if the locals don't know or are not familiar with navigating them, then those benefits diminish. Here in the states, drivers entering a roundabout are required to yield to those already in it. Roundabouts are also an extra challenge for vision impaired pedestrians to navigate across/through. Drivers are required to yield to blind pedestrians, but the problem is that where drivers look to navigate the circle is generally not where pedestrians need to cross.

We also have traffic circles, in the traditional and modern types.

And giving a nod to French highway design, diverging-diamond interchanges are gaining popularity here in the states. The older favorite, a single-point urban interchange (spui) is less and less popular due to the challenge of upgrading them for greater capacity.

... but enough of me nerding out on this stuff ... B)

Edited by Elovia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So we're off to the US tomorrow. Staying overnight at a hotel near Gatwick Airport for an early start on Friday and a months parking for the car. 

We booked our fast passes with 5 days at Disney over the last few weeks. I think we got all the rides we wanted, although the newest Avatar ride passes weren't available for the first week, for some reason. 

We've booked to stay at the  Loews Royal Pacific resort at Orlando for one night. It's expensive at around £350 per night, but gets you fast passes over two days, which would otherwise be nearly double that. 

The plan is that we go to Universal in the first few days and, if we get on the rides we want, we'll cancel the night at Loews. We have 4 days at Universal.

We also have a day scheduled for Kennedy, and we're visiting Venice Beach for a day, hunting fossilised sharks teeth.

 

I probably won't get much of a chance to post until early August, so enjoy the next month or so, ya hear.

Dunnar, Elovia and Jag like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope the weather is cooperative for you.  We went to Disney Orlando a couple years ago near the end of July and it was friggin hot ... and humid ... and we spent a lot of time at the pool.

Kennedy Space Center is it's own kind of cool for engineering nerds like myself.  Not much to see for the basic entrance fee other than a few rockets, the mercury capsule, a gift shop, and assorted scheduled IMAX movies.  Oh, and they have an interactive museum of sorts that includes one of the real space shuttles ... fun for kids of all ages (possibly educational too).  I hear it is worthwhile paying extra for the bus tours to the inner sanctum of center.  If you really splurge, you could even have lunch with a real live astronaut.

If you're down in the neighborhood of Cocoa Beach (a short trip south of Kennedy Space Center), it may be worthwhile popping in to Ron Jon's Surf Shop.  When we went to Disney, we spent an extra week afterward just hanging out in Cocoa Beach (also a trip to KSC), and Ron Jon's was a fun place to shop for beach goodies since it was just a short walk from our hotel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I'll start at the end. 

At the start of our way home, we got the E train from Lexington and 43rd to Jamaica stn, to change for the AirTrain to JFK. It's really tough to get through the barriers with large cases and a small child. Some random young chap paid to let my wife through with his own ticket, then opened the service doors for us.

Lady on the platform noticed our obvious British tourist-ness and confirmed (without being asked to do so) that we were on the right platform for JFK. Without realising it, i really appreciated that gesture.

We got on the train. The driver was making some half-understood announcement about someone being sick at a station we had stopped at. Halfway between the next few stations, a lady sat next to me told me (again without being asked) that the train had to take a different route and wouldn't be going to JFK. She told us the station we had to get off, to get the train behind us. We were so grateful, as those facts had completely missed us, in the announcement.

At the station before our new stop, the lady who had helped at the platform was leaving another carriage and stopped at our doors to tell us the same thing, that lady next to me had just said.

On the 2nd train. a very pleasant young-ish chap in a suit struck up a lovely conversation about our travels. 

I appreciate this may all seem rather trivial, but at that time, with the stress of travelling and being responsible for ones family, to have all of that assistance, and especially as we didn't ask for it or expect it; it was offered with generosity and care. Both Caren and I were genuinely moved. I honestly do not think you would see that in the UK. I certainly haven't in all my years here.

Not without exception (i'll get to that later), but, in general, we found Americans to be generous of spirit, pleasant and considerate, they seemed to be anxious but excited about the future, upbeat and not depressed. Caren, especially, noted how much she thought of the people we met and saw, and she is not at all given to offering such opinions usually.

P.S. In Orlando I was slim and tall. In NY I was fat'n'short. A nation of contrasts.

Edited by Pasanda
Jag, Dunnar, Lasraik and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Orlando was both anticipated and a surprise. 

I sought out loads of advice from folk in the uk. Florida is a major destination for the british and looking at the population maps shown by some rides, indicating the source countries of ride participants, UK was easily the 2nd most populous after the US, and even then, only 2-3 parts of the US beat the UK.

The one key bit of advice that no-one thought to mention, was around Disney past passes. We had booked them to spread across the full day. We did not know that once you'd used your 3, you could then go and book more. So we couldn't book additional until the end of the day. Saying that...

I suspect the parks were unnaturally quiet. They were busy, and we've nothing to compare our experiences too. But judging by queue lengths and what we'd been given to expect, we did well. Although US kids were on vacation, we took Fin out of school 2 weeks before the end of the year, and suspect that lack of UK holiday-makers made a big difference. With the exception of the 7 dwarves ride, which was 90 minutes (we didn't bother) the longest queues were under hour. Our longest was 55 mins. We did every ride we wanted to at least once, and some 2-3 times. Fins favourite ride was rip ride rocket. Just an intense roller coaster, into which i only barely fit. My two favourites were the Mummy, which was just very well produced and included several surprises, and probably the Gringotts ride - mostly because of the overall setting and experience.

I found Diagon-alley the best part of the parks overall. It was just so well done. None of us are particular HP fans, and my wife in particular has now resolved to watch the movies with us, as a result. I was somewhat and relatively disappointed by Hogsmead. The school building was amazing, but the rest of the area, was only OK, and the rides not as good.

Another favourite of us all, for a completely different reason, was the evening show at the Animal Kingdom, Rivers of Light. It was both lovely to watch and technically awesome. In quite a large lake, they control boats and floats full of light shows and actors. Both the floats, boats and shores had very powerful water-cannons that created a complex and huge array of water mists. On these mists the projected huge 3D images and film. It was quite magical.

Other highlights were the Hulk coaster, and A mention should also go to the safari tour at the Animal Kingdom, which was well done. Fin loved it. There was a tendency towards the newer rides opting for simulators of several different types, some 3d, some imax. Some mixed coasters with simulators, with varying degrees of success. The fast and furious ride did this mix quite well. But we weren't blown away by any of it. I found myself comparing the experiences with what i can get on the rift at home and, apart from adding a sense of real motion, they were sometimes sub-par.

 

Both Universal and Disney parks had failures to their central AC systems, which effectively closed the parks for half the day on each occasion. Storms also stopped the major rides from operating for several hours on two of the days, which then made all the other rides too busy to bother with. This would have been disappointing, but for the fact th by this point, we had all agreed we are not theme-park lovers. 

It was very hot, and very humid. In hit the mid 40's on a few days. Half of the queues had AC, a quarter just fans (some slightly better with misters)and a quarter neither. This should have been better.

Often our favourite experiences were the slower tour-type rides, that took time to show and explain stuff.

<I'll post some pics related to this post later.>

2018-07-10 09.49.47.jpg

2018-07-10 10.03.28.jpg

2018-07-10 10.03.30.jpg

2018-07-10 10.55.29.jpg

2018-07-10 13.09.39.jpg

2018-07-12 16.16.53.jpg

2018-07-13 09.07.25.jpg

2018-07-13 11.12.44.jpg

2018-07-15 13.25.26.jpg

2018-07-15 16.02.16.jpg

2018-07-15 16.05.27.jpg

2018-07-15 16.49.29.jpg

2018-07-15 16.57.28.jpg

2018-07-15 21.29.15.jpg

2018-07-18 17.28.20.jpg

2018-07-19 08.51.03.jpg

2018-07-21 09.58.27.jpg

2018-07-22 10.47.15.jpg

Edited by Pasanda
JesGolbez, Dunnar, Lasraik and 4 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice report, thanks.

8 hours ago, Pasanda said:

Half of the queues had AC, a quarter just fans (some slightly better with misters)and a quarter neither. This should have been better.

This part cracked me up. We're so decadent. :D

Packing a beard too these days eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Wolphard said:

Nice report, thanks.

This part cracked me up. We're so decadent. :D

Packing a beard too these days eh?

I find the whole idea of just queuing abhorrent when it's entertainment I've just paid an arm and a leg for. Queuing in the mid 40's heat and sun is uncomfortable and dangerous. Doing that without shelter or cooling is unacceptable. What's odd to me is that these places assume we're gullible enough to accept it. What's sad to me is that we do.

We've pretty much agreed that these places are off the menu for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I hear that. Amusementparks have little that interests me. Queueing 2 hours for a ride I'm not going to like a lot to begin with really is annoying. And they are idd very expensive too. Luckily, last year I went on a Disneyland- & an Europapark vacation. As compensation, the whole of 2018 I'm exempt from trips to amusement parks. My wife, my mother-in-law & the kids went to Slagharen yesterday. I had a quiet day at home. 

Stll, try to explain your complaint about a lack of airconditioning in queue to a farmer in Texas/Mexico/Greece/Turkey/Israel/etc.

Edited by Wolphard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/4/2018 at 7:56 AM, Pasanda said:

with the stress of travelling and being responsible for ones family,

I 1000% get that.  I have those same issues.

We did try to warn you about Florida in late July.  In the Summer, it is normal for rides to be shut down because of near by storms.  Happened dam near every time I went.

The only amusement park that I enjoy anymore is Cedar Point with Fast Passes.  That park is all about the roller coasters.  And if you go, I will do everything in my power to go with you.

Glad to hear you were treated nicely (mostly). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The 2 highlights of our Florida leg were as follows:

 

Fossilised shark tooth hunting at Venice Beach, Fl.

I have a friend who is a massive fan of all things sharkey. He had advised us to take the time to go, and he'd lent me a locally produced guide book on the subject. Allegedly, for literally millions of years, the gulf of mexico has been concentrating and washing up shark teeth onto the west coast of the peninsula. Teeth can range from microscopic, to megalodon teeth as big as an adult hand, and worth £1000's. They are at least 20,000 years old and metallic black, although new teeth wash up too.

We left relatively early on a Monday. It was about a 2.5 hour drive from Orlando to Venice Beach. I must admit, i was very anxious about the trip. I knew finding teeth was hit and miss and we'd been building up to this for several months. What if we didn't find anything?  It is a lovely place, regardless of the epic quest. Reminiscent of CA. Lovely white/grey sand. Open skies and fab weather.

We parked at a place that was well known locally and talked about with my friend, called Sharkeys on the Pier. It's a restaurant, bar and shack/shop. We perked a few hundred meters north, but a public toilet. The toilet itself was just lovely (i shit you not - pun intended), it was like a small clapboard house, raised above the dunes, with shaded picnic benches all around. It was being superbly maintained by a team of cleaners, when we arrived. 

We walked north up the beach from that point. I was trying to distract my son from not having found anything, by teasing him that i'd be the first to find anything. My friend said he'd had most success about 1km north of Sharkeys and pretty much exactly 1km north of Sharkeys the call went up from Fin "Found one". It was the first, the largest, and the finest - a Tiger Shark tooth. Very distinctive as the edges are wickedly serrated.

5b68109f1f7e4_2018-07-0917_09_23.thumb.jpg.78d5375c985b37f8213c11e94c74cb74.jpg

 

Now we were getting our "eye", over the next hour we found around 6, and were all finding them.

The sand on the beach is a lovely grey white, which makes the teeth easier to see. You can find them in the wash-up - the bit at the highest point as the waves come in, which more foamy and contains the debris. The sea was lovely and warm and the beach was practically deserted. But it was too hot and after an hour or two, we decided to head to Sharkeys for lunch.

Having an enviable spot and something of a monopoly in the area, I expected Sharkey's to be very pricey. It was surprisingly reasonable. My wife and I shared the seafood combo platter, including Grouper, which was lovely. I treated myself to a Pina Colada, which was possibly the best Pina Colada i've every had - and i've had many - and ridiculously cheap.

5b6815fc2136a_2018-07-0911_14_09.thumb.jpg.c25be270a932eacdc197aa5ba2dd1bb9.jpg

5b68160ba3e74_2018-07-0915_31_36.thumb.jpg.d39bcef45b5ff22a1eb7a3c5f2736574.jpg

5b681605eee69_2018-07-0912_42_30.thumb.jpg.eeccea6bd27c83cb247877cad6735194.jpg

 

I think the last piece is fossilised wood, or perhaps one of Washingtons teeth?

 

5b6819255e424_2018-07-2010_19_52.thumb.jpg.a4d5444d8449abb765e9ff507239b9bb.jpg

 

 

JFK space Centre

Actually, the space centre was just OK, but the Saturn V blew me away, as i suspected it might. How do we continue to expend so much energy on hate and wars, when we are capable of what i can only really describe as a miracle. Not only the feat of engineering, but the fact that it took the combined efforts of so many people from so many countries, and it was half a century ago. I don't believe humanity has ever surpassed this achievement, and am saddened to think that it is quite possible that we may never do so again. 

 

 

5b6817f05ef5c_2018-07-1614_02_26.thumb.jpg.4ad48fb3481a43504ced9f8160e48bd0.jpg

I've just realised the perspective on this photo is misleading, as we're standing several meters forward of the rocket, it appears smaller than it actually is. If you want the true sense of the size, look at the man in the navy t-shirt and cream shorts walking by the blue support framework much further back and to the right of the photo. Each of the 5 nozzles is about 3 adults high.

5b68180a2802e_2018-07-1614_08_44.thumb.jpg.1f32ded74f9f1bae04e3a237c92dcb26.jpg

Edited by Pasanda
Elovia and Dunnar like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New york

We spent 5 days in Manhattan about 15 years ago (Coincidentally, after visiting Mykhal from this forum, in SC.). TBH, i was so blown away by the architecture of the city at that time (not the new stuff, that's mostly shyte), i didn't really spend much time experiencing anything else.

It was different this time. we spent 8 days there. In spite of staying in a Hilton, it was a massive downward tumble from our resort townhouse in Florida. I won't bang on about our accommodation, but just to say that a mini-fridge would have made a big difference.

We stay in in eastern mid-town Manhattan, about 8 blocks north of ESB and 8 blocks south of Central Park, on Lexington, on the junction of about 4 different metro lines. I couldn't fault the neighbourhood for it's central location, although next time i think i'd go for something a bit more on the outskirts, in a more residential part of the city. We were directly opposite a big eatery/food court shared by around 10 different take-out outlets, a bar selling fab craft beers and seating if you wanted it. We eat out here in the evening, more then anywhere else really. We had a range of traditional diners within 2 blocks, which we enjoyed pretty much every morning. Fin and I enjoyed our pancakes, waffles and french toast most mornings, while Caren was usually disgustingly sensible. Portions were good and prices reasonable. Probably around 10% 15% more than UK when you factor in the tip.

Both of those plates were part of his breakfast.

5b6830a03a9c9_2018-07-0712_29_42.thumb.jpg.84b062a81b551c9636d0b230d78bd4a7.jpg

One thing we did early on, that I would recommend for anyone on a tourist-tip, is the buy the 5 day bus pass from Top-view. You get two big guided loops of jump-on and off for North Manhattan and south Man. You get non stop tours of Harlem, the Bronx and Brooklyn. You get a 2 hour harbour ferry tour incl. SoL and you get 2 hours bike hire in CP. We paid just norht of $50 each, which i found to be a real bargain. We used that bus to just get around the city and only made two trips by subway. The ferry tour included some very interesting weather that had us imagining the end of the world was nigh.

5b683abc14562_2018-07-2715_08.11-6.thumb.jpg.3946482d49addde589ed350ad0e7027f.jpg

One day we got the bus to Battery park in the far south of the island, walked up to China Town for our evening meal and then walked back to the Hotel. This took an hour from the restaurant, and the hotel is about 1/3 up the island. You could probably do the whole of Manhattan in 4 hours walk - and it's a great way to see the city. Fin had asked me earlier that day why they were called skyscapers. On the long walk home we passed the ESB, whose top was disappearing into cloud. I point up and told Fin "That's why". He got it far better than my earlier explanation.

5b686d2ec9b2e_2018-07-2521_16_01.thumb.jpg.e86e02ae21e82cb13e63eb7630a19099.jpg

NY Supermarkets are lovely places. They seem to have perfected the art of having a wider choice and higher quality, than you find in shops 10 times the size. We decided to have a picnic in CP after visiting one. We happened to find a spot, just in front of a covered seating area, where a group had decided to have their wedding. So our picnic was accompanied by a cello, violin and soprano ensemble, (and a cold can of Stone IPA). I must say, it was just lovely.

5b686c2e5d043_2018-07-2916_11_20.thumb.jpg.405f5ec39794b0ce47946482ae345c33.jpg

 

Most of the 8 days, were doing typical touristy stuff like going up the ESB, which i won't bore you with. The only other day of note, was a Saturday, when we were on the way to pick up the bus from Time Square, which you cannot really get to without crossing the Avenue of the Americas. What we didn't know was on Saturdays there is a half mile long market lining both side of the avenue for the day. We quickly changed plans and spent a fab few hours soaking that in. I would recommend it to anyone in the area.

5b686c2b686ed_2018-07-2813_12_50.thumb.jpg.482fcdc6accbc3bc1c9b7cfed1cee8c5.jpg

 

 

My one bad experience.

One day we tried something other than Starbucks for a break (my wife loves the almond croissant in Starbucks, but i wanted a change). We went to somewhere even posher (can't recall the name, something lie "Roast"). There were two service points, one marked for online pre-orders only, and the other marked for counter sales. I duly stood at the counter sales point for a few minutes, noting that there was no-one else there. All the time, other folk were being served at the "online sales only" point, for what i assumed was online sales. After 5 mins, I asked a gentleman who had just walked up. He told me that i should have been waiting in his queue. Another sales person turned up, and this same chap started putting his order in. I cut across explaining that i'd been there far longer. His response was "Yeah, but you're in the wrong queue". I just glared at him and continued giving my order to the person behind the counter. This chap kep grumbling under his breath. So i gave turned to him and said if it was so important to get ahead of me, then go ahead. He continued to grumble, but did nothing more. I informed the person on the desk that their signage was poor and misleading. They couldn't give a fuck. So i placed my order and waited at the pick up place, where I watched. 

The same chap who who served me, came out with 2 almond croissant. One he placed on a small plate, this was much darker, it looked almost burnt. The other on a plate, which he put on a tray, this looked pale, as they should. This was mine - i had other things in my order. The other 3 drinks i ordered too several minutes (icy frappucino stuff always takes an age). While waiting i watched a pretty young girl came up to get her croissant. She looked at hers, then looked at mine and talked to this guy behind the counter. He then swapped my light one for hers. 

Several minutes later, he completed my order. I went up to collect it. Put my hand on the croissant, which was clearly going to be cold, which it was. And i said, that's cold. The guy said he couldn't change it, because i'd touched. I said how would i know it was cold, without touching it. We had reached an impasse. He had to get the permission from his manager, who said just to re-heat it. I then said it was burned, and another argument ensued. I ended up just putting up with the burned, cold croissant, which i will confess i would rarely do - i'm usually well up for a fight. But i just wanted some peace. I wish i'd remembered to remind him that he's already swapped it for someone else, and i wish i'd remember the name of the coffee shop, so i could write a stinky review.

This remains my only poor experience out of a month in the US.

 

Boag, Lasraik, Dunnar and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Other observations:

Points to note on affordability. 

Pretty much everything is more expensive in the US, than in the UK. Except petrol (Gas), which is about one third the price. In NYC we tried to buy Fin a standard size snickers, for which the chap wanted $5 - about £3.50. In the UK, you can get a pack of 4 standard snickers routinely for £1.00, around $1.40. So literally 10 times the price. Bottled water is 50% more. A bottle of Soda, was a real surprise, costing typically $2.99, twice what we'd pay in the UK. While eating out was more expensive, it is relatively less expensive than the UK - where shop ingredients might cost you 10% the cost of eating out. In the US, it might be 40% the cost of eating out, if you catch my drift.

One thing that was good value was the clothing outlets in Orlando. We're not really the sort of folks to make that most of that, as none of us are fashion conscious (as i'm sure you can see), and we don't care about labels. 

Vacation accommodation varied loads. As you might expect, the cost for the 2 bed 3 bathroom resort townhouse, with hot tub and pool, was around £94 per night. The cost of the single room with 2 beds and one bathroom for 8 nights was £175 per night. This would be a similar case in the UK.

So, if you want to visit the UK, as long as you don't drive loads, and plan to eat in a bit more, you should find the country very inexpensive.

 

Culture of waste:

Both of us noticed, really quickly, that the US has a culture of disposability. It seems that everywhere you go to eat or drink, you are given it in am abundance of things designed to be single use and thrown away. When you buy anything, it is always super-wrapped, then put in a bag, which goes in another bag. We saw very little recycling, except the occasional token gesture at segregated bins that everyone seemed to ignore. The people on checkout who do the packing put zero effort into minimising bag use, usually half the bags would have done, as they were packed so lightly, and double bagging anything resembling glass. We counted the carry-bags we threw out after 17 nights, and there were over 50.  Buy some fries in restaurant? Get the fries on some tissue paper, in a cardboard boat, with a full complement of knives, forks and spoons made of black plastic, in a plastic bag, all on a sheet of paper, on a tray. The tray in reused. considering your culture of eating out, and how many of you there are, there has to be a change. 

I think the UK, as with most of the West is still terrible at this too, but even before the whole waste thing became an issue 20 years ago, we were never like you guys are now. If nothing else it must add a lot to the cost of food.

 

 

Edited by Pasanda
Dunnar, JesGolbez, Elovia and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 05/08/2018 at 7:35 AM, Wolphard said:

Packing a beard too these days eh?

 

Part of my ethos on life is to put as little effort into my appearance as humanly possible - comfort is my only standard. Beards are easier, and currently more acceptable. Even when i shaved, it was only once a week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/6/2018 at 9:47 AM, Pasanda said:

This remains my only poor experience out of a month in the US.

Glad to hear you enjoyed America for the most part! 

Next time, go to a Chick-fil-A; we still have damn good coffee, and we'll do about whatever you want. 

Also, when you come back, consider exploring the Mid-West. Maybe even Colorado? 

The only thing I'd recommend is making sure that you have a day or 2 to do nothing in Colorado, especially the first days. Because if you don't, the altitude will mess with you, especially in the mountains. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0