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Elovia

The TGA Recipe Book (or something like it)

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I've never had a breakfast burrito, but i think i'd love it. There are a number of ingredients in that which are unavailable here.

Colby and Jack cheese. Don't knpw what they are.

Salsa might be available, if you mean the tomato and cilantro salad thing.

You can't get green chili's diced in a can, or any other way in a can, that i know of.

Never heard of pepper-crust bacon.

Chorizo here only comes in sausages in skins. Do you mean to strip the chorizo meat out of the skins?

Never heard of hash browns o'briens. Hash browns here a triangle shaped pieces of potato and onion.

Perhaps i'll have a bowl of cereal :P

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1 hour ago, Pasanda said:

I've never had a breakfast burrito, but i think i'd love it. There are a number of ingredients in that which are unavailable here.

Colby and Jack cheese. Don't knpw what they are.

Salsa might be available, if you mean the tomato and cilantro salad thing.

You can't get green chili's diced in a can, or any other way in a can, that i know of.

Never heard of pepper-crust bacon.

Chorizo here only comes in sausages in skins. Do you mean to strip the chorizo meat out of the skins?

Never heard of hash browns o'briens. Hash browns here a triangle shaped pieces of potato and onion.

Perhaps i'll have a bowl of cereal :P

No salsa, Colby Jack, hash browns or pepper crust bacon??? Do you live in Siberia? Or a Soviet gulag?

Never had a breakfast burrito? Oh the humanity!

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3 hours ago, Pasanda said:

I've never had a breakfast burrito, but i think i'd love it. There are a number of ingredients in that which are unavailable here.

Colby and Jack cheese. Don't knpw what they are.

Salsa might be available, if you mean the tomato and cilantro salad thing.

You can't get green chili's diced in a can, or any other way in a can, that i know of.

Never heard of pepper-crust bacon.

Chorizo here only comes in sausages in skins. Do you mean to strip the chorizo meat out of the skins?

Never heard of hash browns o'briens. Hash browns here a triangle shaped pieces of potato and onion.

Perhaps i'll have a bowl of cereal :P

Never had a breakfast burrito?  Next time you stop by, I'll whip you up a batch.  ;)

Below are examples of the ingredients:

Salsa ... as seen here or here.

The cheese ... as seen here.

Green chilies ... as seen here.

Pepper-crust bacon ... as seen here.

Potatoes O'Brien ... as seen here.

... and chorizo ... either make the previous recipe (preferred) or use store bought.  If store bought, I recommend Johnsonville ground sausage, but they also make grilling links that can be stripped from their casings and used.

 

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On 04/06/2018 at 2:11 AM, Elovia said:

Never had a breakfast burrito?  Next time you stop by, I'll whip you up a batch.  ;)

Below are examples of the ingredients:

Salsa ... as seen here or here.

The cheese ... as seen here.

Green chilies ... as seen here.

Pepper-crust bacon ... as seen here.

Potatoes O'Brien ... as seen here.

... and chorizo ... either make the previous recipe (preferred) or use store bought.  If store bought, I recommend Johnsonville ground sausage, but they also make grilling links that can be stripped from their casings and used.

 

Thanks. Salsa is the same. That's about it.

The rest is alien shit you mucky foreigners eat, or invent just to piss us off. (i'm going with the latter). Potatoes O'brien - who every heard of such nonsense. Next you'll be having me looking for Chicken Pasanda.

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Quote

 

Pasanda is a traditional and popular north Indian dish similar to Korma but a bit more fruity.

It was originally made with lamb or mutton steaks which were cut into strips and flattened, marinated, then fried in a dish with various spices. But this version of the Chicken Pasanda dish (which means it’s SO much better!) is made with chicken breasts that are tenderised in yoghurt, chillies, cumin, peppercorns, and garam masala, then cooked in the creamy pasanda sauce made with roasted almonds."

 

Now we know why he is a bit on the "fruity" side.

Edited by Jag

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58 minutes ago, Jag said:

Chicken in yoghurt

First off ... why are they spelling yogurt with an H?

Second ... who puts meat in yogurt?  I've heard of fruit on the bottom, but never meat.  

 

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5 hours ago, Pasanda said:

Potatoes O'brien - who every heard of such nonsense. 

Judging on name alone, I suspect it of Irish origin.  That's relatively close to your neck of the woods, innit?

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1 hour ago, Elovia said:

Judging on name alone, I suspect it of Irish origin.  That's relatively close to your neck of the woods, innit?

Just cause someone, of irish descent, invented this obscure nonsense, doesn't mean we can buy it on an island 200 miles off the coast of his original birthplace a few centuries ago. #bitovastretch

Like your local delicacy, the Labba Stew.

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BTW. Big batch has been in the Fridge since Saturday. On Sunday i gave a small sample to my BBQ king neighbour, who said he really liked it. But we both agreed it needed more smoke. Tonight i added a few extra bits of the smokey parts of the recipe, cooked it a few mins longer and it's gone back in the fridge.

I think it's more about the ingredient differences between US and UK versions. Solid backbone and good enough to go into a bottle.

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5 hours ago, Pasanda said:

BTW. Big batch has been in the Fridge since Saturday. On Sunday i gave a small sample to my BBQ king neighbour, who said he really liked it. But we both agreed it needed more smoke. Tonight i added a few extra bits of the smokey parts of the recipe, cooked it a few mins longer and it's gone back in the fridge.

I think it's more about the ingredient differences between US and UK versions. Solid backbone and good enough to go into a bottle.

I went back to closely look at the photo of ingredients you posted earlier.  All seems normal except one ingredient, and this one shouldn't affect the smokiness of the sauce, which is the cumin.  It looks like you have a jar of cumin seeds on the counter whereas the recipe lists ground cumin (powder).  Did you grind it yourself by chance?  Just curious.  No worries, though, as flavor preference is subjective.  I usually use Jack Daniels Old No. 7, because its relatively inexpensive here, but I see no reason your choice wouldn't work as well.

What are you going to grill with the sauce?  I may have to pop over for a bite.

p.s. I love the tile you selected for your kitchen backsplash. 

Edited by Elovia

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18 hours ago, Elovia said:

I went back to closely look at the photo of ingredients you posted earlier.  All seems normal except one ingredient, and this one shouldn't affect the smokiness of the sauce, which is the cumin.  It looks like you have a jar of cumin seeds on the counter whereas the recipe lists ground cumin (powder).  Did you grind it yourself by chance?  Just curious.  No worries, though, as flavor preference is subjective.  I usually use Jack Daniels Old No. 7, because its relatively inexpensive here, but I see no reason your choice wouldn't work as well.

What are you going to grill with the sauce?  I may have to pop over for a bite.

p.s. I love the tile you selected for your kitchen backsplash. 

Yeah, i ground the life out of them first. I tend to grind all my spices from whole when i make curries. So keep a good selection of whole spices. I find pre-ground lose potency after a few weeks.

Tonight i chucked half the mix over 9 pork shoulder steaks. It's a good few kilos of meat. I will also be marinading some salmon steaks for skewers later. Salmon is a bit delicate without the skin on to marinade for too long. I will probably baste some of the sauce on the pork steaks while cooking and then leave a small pot out as a dipping sauce for sausages etc.

Thanks, yet. I love it too. It's called Oyster schist, or split-face tiling, and works really well when there is hidden light source shining down across the face from above (that photo is from a low position - you can't normally see the under counter LED strips). It's all the way around the kitchen. See below. It was also surprisingly good value, being among the least expensive tiling available.

20180606_215018.jpg

Edited by Pasanda
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So you've got this great barbecue party planned this weekend.  Great!  But what have you planned for next weekend when you're sick of eating all those leftovers.  You may want to toss a couple beer bratwursts on the grill, serve them in buns with a little sauerkraut and mustard.  What's that?  You don't have a decent mustard to flavor up those beer brats?  Well here you go ...

I obtained this recipe from the greater internet, but the page from which I copied it is no longer available.  I don't claim credit for this one, except I will pass it along and share it, and I will attest it is 110% the perfect mustard to slather on a grilled beer bratwurst.  My wife generally doesn't care much for mustard, but she really digs this one ... especially on brats.

--------------------------------------------

Irish Oktoberfest Mustard

Ingredients:

One 12 oz Bottle of Guinness Beer (room temperature)

3/4 cup brown mustard seeds

3/4 cup yellow mustard seeds

1 cup red wine vinegar

1 tablespoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in a non-reactive bowl (e.g., ceramic or glass, not metal or plastic)

Cover and let sit at room temperature for 1-2 days so the mustard seeds will soften and flavors will meld.

Transfer to food processor or blender and process until it has reached your desired consistency, stopping occasionally to scrape down sides.  Some like it coarser than others.  I personally like it smooth with a little coarseness so I process it in small batches in a blender, adding more slowly as the previous amount gets pureed, until the whole batch is done.

Transfer to sterile glass jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace.  Wipe rims and process for 10 minutes (you know, canning stuff for long-term storage).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Edited by Elovia
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I'll tag that one for later. I suspect i'll have "cooking" out of my system for a few weeks. Conjuring magic with leftovers is what i do, but that certainly sounds nice.

Also, Beer Bratwurst - never heard of them. Normal Bratwurst; available, but certainly not common. We really just do sausages. Sausages of every kind imaginable, but just sausages.

For tomorrow meat-wise:

Pork Shoulder steaks - with Elovia-sauce.

British Beef Ribeye steaks

Salmon steaks; plain, Basil Pesto and Elovia sauce.

Salmon kebabs with shallots, sweet peppers, and mushrooms; plain, pesto and Elovia-sauce.

Pork and herb sausages

Cumberland sausage.

Steak burgers.

 

Drink-wise, and aside from beers n such, i've invented a summer cocktail. If you look at that photo of the tiles. Locate the orange kettle. To the left is a big granite pestle and mortar, and to the left of that is an 8 litre (1.75 gallon) drinks dispenser and an iron stand. That's for the cocktail.

1.5 litres JJ Whitney elderflower gin.

1 litre passion fruit juice.

4.5 litres lime tonic.

Stacks of sliced lime and ice.

 

Anyone is welcome.

Edited by Pasanda
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So the bbq was yesterday. Started at 15:00 and finished at around 23:00. We had around 21 in total, of around 50/50 kids to adults. Turned out my uber bbq chef next door did pretty much all the cooking, which was amazingly generous. The summer punch went down very well. I have just finished off the left overs tonight. 

[edit]The star was Elovias bbq sauce, which i used on both the pork shoulder steaks and a third of the salmon kebabs. My bbq neighbour thinks you're a god. I'm actively trying to dissuade him of course.

The kids spent all afternoon with water balloons, water pistols and... well... water. My favourite bit was after the cooking and eating was done. The sounds were going, everyone was mellow. It was warm and the red wine was exceptional (it pains me to say, a US Californian Lodi Shiraz).

I didn't even think to take a photo all day.

Thanks Elovia.

 

Edited by Pasanda
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1 minute ago, Pasanda said:

Thanks Elovia.

Thanks for trying it and for the awesome feedback.  Now that you have, you know you can make more bbq sauce any time and enjoy it all that more.

My motto ... never trust a skinny cook ... as I point to my wholesome girth.  :D

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12 hours ago, Elovia said:

Thanks for trying it and for the awesome feedback.  Now that you have, you know you can make more bbq sauce any time and enjoy it all that more.

My motto ... never trust a skinny cook ... as I point to my wholesome girth.  :D

OMG. I shit you not. That is written on the apron i was wearing all afternoon (well, until i realised that i wasn't actually doing any cooking, and it was basically fraudulent).

I haven't even seen my girth since i was in my 30's (unless i stand in front of a mirror).

Edited by Pasanda

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Holiday cookie recipe time ... as requested by @Pasanda

Biscochos

(a.k.a. “Biscochitos” – literally “little biscuits” in Spanish)

Biscochitos are the official state cookie of New Mexico (one of the four states along the Mexican border in the southwest United States).  The cookies are kind of like a butter cookie or a shortbread cookie, and they should have a flaky texture with predominant flavors of Orange, Cinnamon, Cloves, and Anise.

This recipe makes a lot of cookies, so you may want to make only a half-batch if you’re making them for the first time.  We like to share as gifts or with co-workers.

Ingredients

2 lbs  Lard (do not substitute shortening or butter - this recipe has best results with Lard)

1-3/4 cup Sugar

2 Eggs, well beaten

Juice of 3 medium oranges (about 1 cup of fresh-squeezed juice – use fresh, not frozen)

2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp salt

1 tsp ground cloves

1-1/2 tsp cinnamon

6-8 Tbsp crushed whole anise seed

About 8 cups flour … start with 6 cups and work your way up

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

In a kitchen stand mixer, cream the lard and sugar until light and fluffy – about 3 minutes.  Add the eggs, spices, baking powder, salt and juice, and then beat it all together well.  Add just enough flour to make the dough stiff; it should be similar in consistency to pie crust dough.  If you add too much flour, the cookies will not be flaky.  Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough into a 1/4-inch thick sheet.

Use a round scalloped edge cookie cutter (approximately 2-1/2 inch diameter) or a diamond shaped one to cut out the individual cookies from the sheet.  Place the cut out cookies on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and bake them in the preheated oven for 10-12 minutes or until just barely golden brown; be careful not to over bake.  Let the cookies cool for one minute.

While the cookies are still hot, carefully roll them in a mixture of sugar and cinnamon (1 cup sugar to 2 teaspoons of cinnamon).  Let them cool on a baking rack, then serve and enjoy.  They’re super tasty warm, but still quite delicious days later at room temperature.

 

 

Edited by Elovia
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Thanks Elovia. Really interesting to see Lard in there. With cloves and orange, it seems very Christmassy. I will definitely try it. Although i'll probably start with half the amounts, as it seems to make a LOT!!!

 

 

Christmas bubble and squeak.

1. Chop up all your Christmas dinner left-overs really small.

2. Fry it.

(3. for our US cousins. Put Cheese on it).

 

Edited by Pasanda

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I'm familiar with anise seed, or aniseed as we call it, but i will be substituting it for star anise, which is very similar, and I already have it at home.

Do you know what kind of flour? I'm guessing plain white, as you've also got baking powder.

Edited by Pasanda

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My wife confided that she quarters the recipe (yes, half an egg) and it makes about 3 dozen cookies.  So you could try that.  Regular white flour, yes.

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Wow. I guess i'm going to at least quarter it too. You can get small eggs, and a little extra egg usually just makes it a bit richer. So should be no worries. 

Also, US Hens are the size of UK Goats, so it should all even out.

Edited by Pasanda

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3 hours ago, Pasanda said:

Wow. I guess i'm going to at least quarter it too. You can get small eggs, and a little extra egg usually just makes it a bit richer. So should be no worries. 

Also, US Hens are the size of UK Goats, so it should all even out.

I was not aware UK goats laid eggs.  Hmmpf ... learn something new every day.  :)

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