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Elovia

The TGA Recipe Book (or something like it)

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I'm actually looking to start cookery classes, you know so that I can actually cook food for once. Will keep an eye on this thread so that once I start actually understanding what you are all talking about I can try making them.

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On 12/20/2018 at 0:12 PM, Jazz said:

I'm actually looking to start cookery classes, you know so that I can actually cook food for once. Will keep an eye on this thread so that once I start actually understanding what you are all talking about I can try making them.

It's especially useful if you like food and eating it.

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On 12/17/2018 at 9:33 PM, Pasanda said:

Wow. I guess i'm going to at least quarter it too. You can get small eggs, and a little extra egg usually just makes it a bit richer. So should be no worries. 

Also, US Hens are the size of UK Goats, so it should all even out.

Made them. Even though i used a quarter of the recipe, it still made around 40 buscuits, and i put some pastry back in the fridge unused, as i ran out of baking sheets.

Something went wrong with the measurements as i used over 3 times more flours than the recipe called for. I suspect too much OJ, but believe the fundamental issue is that we just don't use cups and (as Alexa is happy to explain) cups do not convert to grams, as it's a measure of volume and not weight. 

All that being said, they have been a real hit. The crispyness that comes from the lard is lovely. 

I wet them with my finger and some water before dabbing them in the sugar/cinnamon coating, which possibly covered them more than expected. But i was a bit dubious about having  used too much flour and lacking sweetness. I used some xmas shaped cutters, which turned out rather suspiciously. 

Thanks for sharing Elovia. What i wanted more than anything was to do justice to your family recipe. I'm not entirely sure i have, but the family loved them regardless.

 

2018-12-24 13.56.38.jpg

Edited by Pasanda

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The food hit of the holiday (aside from Elovia's biccies) was Christmas Dinner Bubble and Squeak.

We invited 8 nieghbours over yesterday morning for Breakfast after they both had parties the night before. Among the usual cooked English breakfast of eggs, sausages, bacon, baked beans, mushrooms, toast, I also served up the B&S, which is the coarsely chopped leftovers from the main Dinner. included goose, roast potatoes, roast carrots, roast parsnips, brussel sprouts, 2 types of stuffing and hard fried in olive oil until almost burned.

It went down an absolute storm, and i would commend it to anyone.

What was the start of your holiday?

 

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1 hour ago, Pasanda said:

Something went wrong with the measurements as i used over 3 times more flours than the recipe called for. I suspect too much OJ, but believe the fundamental issue is that we just don't use cups and (as Alexa is happy to explain) cups do not convert to grams, as it's a measure of volume and not weight.

Do you commonly use milliliters (ml) rather than fluid ounces (fl.oz) as a volume measurement?  Do you have to convert Tablespoon and Teaspoon measurements?

... just asking for future reference.

btw ... and semi-on topic ... the freeware Convert for Windows is exceptionally useful for these, and many other, kinds of translations; I used it extensively while earning my undergraduate engineering degree.  I still use it every now and then when needed.

Edited by Elovia

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As my special annual treat every year to the wife and in-laws, I put on my (invisible but well worn) chef's hat and cook up a sumptuous Christmas Dinner.  And every Christmas, for the past I can't remember how many Christmases, my family and in-laws have requested that I should (again) prepare my famous aged Prime Rib - they complain they only get it once a year.  And over the last several years, I've struggled to find just the right balance of side dishes to complement the Prime Rib - side dishes that don't prove to be so rich and filling that everyone feels overstuffed at dinner's end (I'm looking at you Mr. 4-cheese scalloped potatoes with bacon, sour cream, and chives).  This year I made a light but flavorful savory rice pilaf which I more or less threw together for the first time ever, and it seemed to be a hit because they requested it again.  I'll log it here from memory for posterity (all measurements are approximate, since I didn't actually measure anything):

Elovia's Savory Rice Pilaf

Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 cups long grain white rice
  • 3/4 cup wild brown rice
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme crushed between fingers (would be better with fresh, minced, but I didn't have any)
  • 1/2 cup raw almond slivers, toasted
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 medium sized carrot, diced into 1/8-inch or smaller pieces
  • 1 small onion, diced similar to the carrot
  • 1/2 cup fresh minced parsley

Directions:

  1. Mix white and wild rice in 3-quart rice cooker pot.  Add the chicken broth, bay leaf, and thyme.  Stir all together well, then start the rice cooker.  (note:  you could do the same by cooking the rice/broth/spice mixture in a standard pot on the stove top, as per traditional methods - I'll leave that up to the individual cook's choice)
  2. While the rice is cooking, lightly toast the almond slivers (med-high heat) until they're golden brown in a dry saute pan while stirring often.  Be attentive and mindful while doing this because almonds can easily burn on one side if/when you get momentarily distracted.  Alternatively, one could toast the almond slivers on a sheet pan in an oven, but my oven was busy with other things at the time so toasting them on the stove top was my choice ... which naturally leads to the next step ...
  3. When the almonds are near done toasting in the saute pan, reduce heat and add the butter, diced carrots, and diced onion.  Saute until the onions are clear (approx. 5-10 mins).
  4. By the time the almonds, carrots and onions are done, the rice should also be finished or nearly so.  Find and remove the bay leaf.  In a separate bowl, mix together the cooked rice, sauteed almond/carrot/onion mixture, and the freshly minced parsley.
  5. Serve and enjoy.

Notes:

If you want a sweeter pilaf (e.g., to accompany white meat such as turkey or pork roast), you could add a peeled, cored, and diced Granny Smith apple along with the parsley in the next to last step.

If you want a sweeter pilaf but also with a touch of tartness, you could throw in a small handful of dried cranberries (say ~1/2 cup) and the zest from a medium sized orange.

If you don't like almonds, you could substitute in pecans or walnuts with the aforementioned apple, cranberries, and orange zest.  Walnuts may impart a slightly bitter flavor, if that is to your taste.

There's plenty of creative flexibility in the base recipe.

Edited by Elovia

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On 12/30/2018 at 10:56 PM, Elovia said:

Do you commonly use milliliters (ml) rather than fluid ounces (fl.oz) as a volume measurement?  Do you have to convert Tablespoon and Teaspoon measurements?

... just asking for future reference.

btw ... and semi-on topic ... the freeware Convert for Windows is exceptionally useful for these, and many other, kinds of translations; I used it extensively while earning my undergraduate engineering degree.  I still use it every now and then when needed.

EU is primarily ml and the UK is either Floz or Ml, depending on the age of the baker. I have pretty much transitioned to metric for volume and weight, but still occasionally revert to feet and inches fr length.

We still generally use spoons, in all their variations, for very small amounts of liquid. 

Interesting fact, the metric systems is based on water at sea level. So 1 cubic cm of water weighs 1 gram, 1 litre of water weighs 1kg, and 1 cubic meter of water weighs  1metric ton. 

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Pasanda said:

We still generally use spoons, in all their variations, for very small amounts of liquid.

Tablespoons translate directly to fluid ounces (fl.oz), given that one Tbsp = 1/2 fl.oz (and 1 cup = 8 fl.oz).

I just checked Amazon.co.uk, and they have several sets of nested measuring cups for less than 10 pounds ... slightly more if you want a nice stainless steel set.  Every good kitchen should have one of these. :)

1 hour ago, Pasanda said:

Interesting fact, the metric systems is based on water at sea level. So 1 cubic cm of water weighs 1 gram, 1 litre of water weighs 1kg, and 1 cubic meter of water weighs  1metric ton. 

This was true from 1901 to 1964, but with more recent redefinition of both the meter (length) and kilogram (mass), this relationship is now no longer exact.  Interestingly enough (to those who find interest in such matters), volume (like area) is a derived unit of measure that relies primarily on the definition of length.  /nerd-off

Edited by Elovia
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23 hours ago, Elovia said:

Tablespoons translate directly to fluid ounces (fl.oz), given that one Tbsp = 1/2 fl.oz (and 1 cup = 8 fl.oz).

I just checked Amazon.co.uk, and they have several sets of nested measuring cups for less than 10 pounds ... slightly more if you want a nice stainless steel set.  Every good kitchen should have one of these. :)

This was true from 1901 to 1964, but with more recent redefinition of both the meter (length) and kilogram (mass), this relationship is now no longer exact.  Interestingly enough (to those who find interest in such matters), volume (like area) is a derived unit of measure that relies primarily on the definition of length.  /nerd-off

I was aware that I could buy cup measures. But the need is so infrequent, and to render them next to useless (by the time i came to need them again, i'd have forgotten where I put 'em.

Ahhh. Regarding metric systems, i quoted from what i'd learned and didn't re-check my facts (and you have my permission to shoot me, if ever i do). 

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Posted (edited)

On 5/20/2018 at 1:02 PM, Elovia said:

In another thread, @Pasanda asked for my BBQ sauce recipe.  I've posted this here before, but it probably got lost to one of many forum resets.  So here it is again ... the latest and greatest version.

---------------

Elovia's Triple-S Barbecue Sauce*

(Sweet, Smokey & Spicy)

 *not the commercial sauce of the same name; this one has a different set of "S" qualities

Yeah ... quoting myself.  So what?

I just made the first sauce of the BBQ season, and it is fantastic (if I do say so myself - it's a double batch no less).  I'm also in the process of making a rack of babyback pork ribs for my wife (it's Mother's Day today here in the U.S.); the ribs are in the oven slow cooking and should be ready to finish on the grill in about an hour and a half.  Tender and falling off the bone, mopped with some Triple-S.  To go with, I'll also grill a couple ears of corn generously slathered with butter so it caramelizes.  Now that is good eatin'.

 

Edited by Elovia

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Good to see this revitalised. It has been in my thoughts recently. I still have a small tub frozen from last year. The 2nd batch i made was a tad disappointing. compared to the first. Not quite as smokey, or sweet. 

We've already had one bbq around a friends, and my thoughts are turning to our regular bash for the neighbours, and the reason i made this last year. I was thinking of doing something different, although i know not what...

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On 5/14/2019 at 2:03 AM, Pasanda said:

 I was thinking of doing something different, although i know not what...

This Ginger Sesame Teriyaki sauce is a second go-to at our house, especially during grilling season.  It's easy to make if you have the ingredients.  We use it to marinate chicken, pork, or even Korean style beef short ribs.

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Simple chicken marinade

1/3 cup honey

1/3 cup olive oil

1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce

Salt and pepper if desired

Simple recipe of stuff most everyone has that gives chicken a little something extra when grilling.  You can let it marinade for an hour or even 8+.  I made chicken shish kabobs for mothers day.  Cubed the chicken and let it sit for a few hours.

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Just now, Pasanda said:

Damn it. I only have the high sodium soy sauce <shakes fist at the sun>. Why am i always hindered at the last.

Unfortunately ... I'm at the age where I have to look at stuff like that.  Soy sauce is extremely high in sodium.  Even the low sodium stuff is really high.  You can use regular :D

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