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Pasanda

What was your best decision ever?

21 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

5 hours ago, Jag said:

Going back to school for 6 years at age 34 to become a Doctor of Pharmacy.

Similar for me.  Going back to school at age 45 to complete a BS in Mechanical Engineering, and to then push further to get an MS in Civil Structural Engineering.  I would have pushed even further to pursue a Ph.D, but didn't want to commit academic suicide by getting all three degree levels from the same institution.  It's still on the short list for what to do during retirement.

Edited by Elovia
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I'd have to say, about 15 years ago, i was faced with the option of buying a cheaper house and living better, or buying the most i could possibly afford and living worse. I decided on the latter, and whilst life would have been sweeter in the short term, the rate at which property has been increasing in value has outstripped both my earnings and any bank savings i would have been able to make back then. I've repeated that once again 5 years ago with the same outcome. 

One thing to note is that during the 80's the reverse happened and house prices sank to the point that people owed more on their mortgage than the house was worth. I am always reminding myself that that could happen again.

Make hay while the Sun shines.

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When we bought our house, we decided to keep the condo we were living in.  We never really made a profit on it to start out ... but 15 years later, it is paid off and still being rented.

I'd also have to say choosing to take the family on vacation to Yellowstone/Glacier.  Up until that point, every single one of our family vacations were beach trips.  My original (selfish) motivation for booking that trip was to take a trip that my in-laws couldn't go on.  Going there changed me.

I cannot discern one beach trip from the next, but I will never forget the sound of cracking branches only to have a moose appear in front of us at Glacier.  Or the smells of the hot springs at Yellowstone.  Or the feel of the Yosemite granite after a light coating of rain.  Vacations are no longer a destination, but the beginning of an experience.  Something to carry with me.  In a strange way, it lifted a veil and expanded my horizons.

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On 05/10/2018 at 5:14 PM, MTGMTB said:

Deciding to get my Eagle.

Is there really anything that needs to be said?

I take it there's more to that than a buying a bird? I can only assume it means something different in the US, to what it means elsewhere ...

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Pasanda said:

I take it there's more to that than a buying a bird? I can only assume it means something different in the US, to what it means elsewhere ...

To clarify MTGMTB's statement ...

Eagle Scout is the highest rank achievement in the (international) Boy Scouts organization (who also now accept girls, IRRC).  Earning this achievement represents the culmination of many years demonstrating knowledge and skills in activities including outdoors (e.g., camping, hiking, first aid, etc.) and other life skills (e.g., technology, health, etc.) via earning merit badges pertaining to that knowledge and those skills, as well as providing leadership within the community and to other scouts.  The successful Eagle Scout candidate will have demonstrated his/her ability to live the Scout's motto and oath.  All independent from and extracurricular to school or religeous activities - and before the Scout becomes an adult at 18 years of age.

Although this achievement may seem to be a throwback to earlier (pre-internet) times, many of today's successful leaders had also attained the award and have gone on to do great things for their communities if not nations.  It is a prestigious award that few who join the Scouts will attain.  It is also an award that, outside of the scouting organization, has unfortunately diminished in social prominence.

Fair disclosure: I, too, achieved and was awarded this rank many years ago. 

Edited by Elovia

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Posted (edited)

If he'd just said Eagle Scout, i'd have understood. "Eagle" has many interpretations, and i'd suggest "Eagle Scout" is not the most popular use of the word.

 

Is it still considered cool to be con amb?

 

sorry, i meant confusingly ambiguous. :wub:

Edited by Pasanda

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Posted (edited)

Blah. Chalk it up to the differences between American and British language/culture.  Also, he mentioned getting the award not that long ago ... sometime in the past few months to year ... I can't recall exactly and can't be arsed to look.  :P

Edited by Elovia

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19 hours ago, Elovia said:

Blah. Chalk it up to the differences between American and British language/culture.  Also, he mentioned getting the award not that long ago ... sometime in the past few months to year ... I can't recall exactly and can't be arsed to look.  :P

So the most common use of the word 'Eagle' in the US refers to the senior scout? Not the national bird of the country, nor 2 under par in golf?

If i put 100 Americans of a random smattering of ages and cultures in front of me and asked them to tell me the meaning of Eagle, most would say a senior scout? Well, knock me down with a feather (no pun intended).

I am much more interested in the cultural aspects of this conversation BTW. Not smacking on MTGMTB.

 

 

Edited by Pasanda

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2 hours ago, Pasanda said:

So the most common use of the word 'Eagle' in the US refers to the senior scout? Not the national bird of the country, nor 2 under par in golf?

If i put 100 Americans of a random smattering of ages and cultures in front of me and asked them to tell me the meaning of Eagle, most would say a senior scout? Well, knock me down with a feather (no pun intended).

I am much more interested in the cultural aspects of this conversation BTW. Not smacking on MTGMTB.

English is such a complex language ... sometimes beautiful, other times frustrating.

In this case, when you say eagle, without any context, 100 out of 100 will think the bird.

If you said I shot an eagle, 90 out of 100 would think you were golfing ... depending on the rest of the conversation.

He said he got his Eagle, which 90 out of 100 would think he was a scout.  In addition, he capitalized it ... which wouldn't be done for the bird.

Unless something was named Eagle.  Maybe you name your dog Eagle or something.

my two cents :)

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2 hours ago, Dunnar said:

English is such a complex language ... sometimes beautiful, other times frustrating.

In this case, when you say eagle, without any context, 100 out of 100 will think the bird.

If you said I shot an eagle, 90 out of 100 would think you were golfing ... depending on the rest of the conversation.

He said he got his Eagle, which 90 out of 100 would think he was a scout.  In addition, he capitalized it ... which wouldn't be done for the bird.

Unless something was named Eagle.  Maybe you name your dog Eagle or something.

my two cents :)

Well said. To summarise, 'context is everything'. But you need to be culturally sensitive too.

When i first read, i drew three different conclusions - and i shit you not. It was either an american car called an Eagle (which i seem to remember there is), or he was actually a bird handler, my third was that he was in the armed forces and he was referring to the pistol. We actually don't have Eagle Scouts here. The most senior section of scouts is called Explorers. So having no other frame of reference, i could only work on those three.

So if i had any conclusion to draw it would be to be aware that you're audience is from a variety of cultures and background, and if you choose to use phrases that are at all local, you may not be understood, and you may be excluding people from your conversation.

Cor blimey guv'nor. Stone the crows. I 'ank fer a rube 'n' no mistake. You gern ahtsoid fer an oily or wot?

Edited by Pasanda
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Bah ya bastage. I had a nice long post typed out in rebuttal and then your concession "conext matters" beat me to the punch.  :lol:

Culturally sensitive is optional for those of us in the US.  We leave that to people from irrelevant countries like yours.  :P

(pure jest in good fun)

Edited by Elovia

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32 minutes ago, Pasanda said:

We actually don't have Eagle Scouts here. The most senior section of scouts is called Explorers.

I find this interesting if true (not saying it isn't).  I haven't been involved with the scouting organization in many years, and in that time they've undergone many changes.  Back when I was involved, we had Explorers, too, but they were a subset of Boy Scouts, primarily for the boys who were older and more experienced outdoors(men) and who were ready for challenging outings where difficulty necessitated precluding younger, less experienced or under-prepared scouts.

Eagle Scout was the highest rank within the Boy Scouts. And participation in Explorers was limited to the top three(?) Boy Scout ranks plus a few other requirements (age being one of them).  Explorers were for the top scouts much like Webelos were for the top (older) Cub Scouts.

 

Edited by Elovia

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My colleague across the hall from me is a Scout leader (of my Son's chapter). I spoke to him earlier. The scale in the UK is Beaver Scout(i know, i know), Cub Scout (my Son), Scout, Explorer Scout. After that you join The Scouting Network. There are no more ranked groups.

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6 hours ago, Pasanda said:

my third was that he was in the armed forces and he was referring to the pistol.

Eh, fair enough I guess? I am a bit of a gun nut XD. However, Desert Eagles (Or DEagles, as I will now refer to them to in order to avoid future confusion) are hard to come by and expensive as shit. Not only that, the ammo is basically just "Fuck you, fuck your armor, and fuck anything within a half mile behind you." The only time I would use it would be for fun or MAYBE home defense.

On 10/8/2018 at 2:14 PM, Elovia said:

To clarify MTGMTB's statement ...

Eagle Scout is the highest rank achievement in the (international) Boy Scouts organization (who also now accept girls, IRRC).  Earning this achievement represents the culmination of many years demonstrating knowledge and skills in activities including outdoors (e.g., camping, hiking, first aid, etc.) and other life skills (e.g., technology, health, etc.) via earning merit badges pertaining to that knowledge and those skills, as well as providing leadership within the community and to other scouts.  The successful Eagle Scout candidate will have demonstrated his/her ability to live the Scout's motto and oath.  All independent from and extracurricular to school or religeous activities - and before the Scout becomes an adult at 18 years of age.

Although this achievement may seem to be a throwback to earlier (pre-internet) times, many of today's successful leaders had also attained the award and have gone on to do great things for their communities if not nations.  It is a prestigious award that few who join the Scouts will attain.  It is also an award that, outside of the scouting organization, has unfortunately diminished in social prominence.

Fair disclosure: I, too, achieved and was awarded this rank many years ago. 

DINGDINGDING!!!

12 hours ago, Pasanda said:

So the most common use of the word 'Eagle' in the US refers to the senior scout? Not the national bird of the country, nor 2 under par in golf?

If i put 100 Americans of a random smattering of ages and cultures in front of me and asked them to tell me the meaning of Eagle, most would say a senior scout? Well, knock me down with a feather (no pun intended).

I am much more interested in the cultural aspects of this conversation BTW. Not smacking on MTGMTB.

Generally speaking, yes? Scouts was (At least for the past year) still huge in America.

But now that I think about it, yeah, probably would still be confusing. Unless you clarified as NOT the animal. 

6 hours ago, Elovia said:

Eagle Scout was the highest rank within the Boy Scouts. And participation in Explorers was limited to the top three(?) Boy Scout ranks plus a few other requirements (age being one of them).  Explorers were for the top scouts much like Webelos were for the top (older) Cub Scouts.

Is it Explorers? I thought it was Venture Crew. And this is coming from a staff member at Colorado's biggest camp, and one of the most famous (to my knowledge) in the US. 

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1 hour ago, MTGMTB said:

Is it Explorers? I thought it was Venture Crew. And this is coming from a staff member at Colorado's biggest camp, and one of the most famous (to my knowledge) in the US. 

It used to be, but may not be called that now.  As I previously mentioned, it has been many, many years since I was last involved in the organization.

When I was a Scout, Philmont Ranch in NM was the big name. Times change.

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