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Dunnar

College visits

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When I met some of you, I was just getting out of college myself.  Now I am looking at colleges with my oldest.  Going to these places brings back a ton of emotions.  From the memories of some of the best times of my life to I am old.  To why didn't they have yoga pants when I was a kid to I am old.

It was a lot of fun exposing the kids to the various schools.  All schools have a unique atmosphere and its pretty cool to get a taste of each.  My son has expressed interest in the bigger public state schools, so we took an October weekend to expose him to some of Ohio's best.  I had never been to some of these places and it was a great experience for me as well.  Was also pretty cool driving through our state during fall taking roads that I have never been.

Link to map: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wZ7-avOSdNNA4bjI1TlVAjSx5g49XOSy&usp=sharing

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We started in Athens, Ohio, home of Ohio University.  Athens is a small town located in the rural south western part of the state.  Its out in the middle of nowhere.  They are widely known for their journalism school as well as their annual Halloween Party.  Unbeknownst to us, we were there during Homecoming weekend so the place was packed.  We enjoyed some of the parade and some of the other festivities.

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Next stop was Cincinnati, home of the University of Cincinnati.  Cincinnati is in the south eastern part of the state along the Ohio river bordering Kentucky.  Their urban campus is in the center of the city.  They are known academically for their engineering school and have a pretty good basketball team.

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Next stop was Oxford, home of Miami University.  Oxford is on the eastern edge of the state, about an hour north of Cincinnati and east of Dayton.  Also a rural community but its much closer to some bigger cities.  They are known academically for their teaching programs and for their liberal arts programs.

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Final stop was Columbus, home of The Ohio State University.  Columbus is the states largest city, the state capital and located in the center of the state.  The biggest school in the state and one of the largest in the world.  They used to let anyone in but have tightened their academics quite a bit and rank highly across the board.  They offer the widest range of degrees and are widely known for (sometimes loved, sometimes hated) their athletic teams.

Loved all the schools and thoroughly enjoyed the trip.  October is a great time to drive around the state as we enjoyed the crisp Autumn days.

Pasanda and Lasraik like this

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Thanks for sharing.

66.5k students. Man that's big.

 

I work in a medium sized university. Size is ranked by annual turnover, and we've only just tip over the £100m it takes to be medium.

We have around 10k domestic students and another 7k transnational (our courses franchised to other institutions). We have a prestigious university, quite close, called Cardiff University. That's considered large at 25k students.

 

Phoenix has 142k students! And as many staff as we have students.

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Pick a degree, pick the school based on that degree, but most importantly pick a school based on price.  Undergrad or not sure what they want to do?  Go to the local jc then transfer. 

Undergrad education at US universities is a travesty, unless you get it on scholarship.

 

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42 minutes ago, Jag said:

Pick a degree, pick the school based on that degree, but most importantly pick a school based on price.  Undergrad or not sure what they want to do?  Go to the local jc then transfer. 

Undergrad education at US universities is a travesty, unless you get it on scholarship.

That relates to a couple of conversations we had. 

When I asked my son where he wanted to go, he said far away, like Colorado or Arizona.  Bear in mind, he has never been to either state and never expressed a desire to go to either place until that point.  That is when I explained the difference between out of state and in state tuition.  For those outside of the US, every school has a cost for tuition.  For in-state residence, they typically cost a lot lower.  For instance, Ohio State is roughly $10k in-state and $27k for out of state.  There are lots of reasons for this, primarily because of tax dollars and support.  State tax dollars go to support the university, so by being a resident, it is my tax dollars.

I also had the conversation about Private vs Public universities.  Private schools are generally smaller and are not subsidized with tax dollars the way public universities are.  For instance, University of Dayton is a private university and tuition is $39k.

I told my kids, I will pay for 4 years of your education at a state school. And if you want to go to a private school or an out of state school, you are paying for the difference.  We'll talk about graduate school if it comes to that.

My son has no idea what he wants to be.  He is leaning toward mathematics.  For a variety of reasons, I think that would be the best choice for him at this time.  But with these larger schools, they have a bounty of resources to help you along your path.  Plus plenty of options should you choose to switch majors (almost all kids do).

We also talked about local options, like Youngstown State, then transferring.  He wants to go away to school and I don't have a problem with that.  Mom feels differently :)  I think it will be good for him, no only for school but for life.

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just to clarify, all those costs are annual fees right? So a degree is typically 3 times the figure you cite, right? 

For info, pretty much all degrees (except Oxbridge and private universities) are £9k per annum and most degrees are 3 years long. So £27k is what most families can expect to pay for their kids fees to get a degree. That around $35k.

I have a pile of antiques in my attic that Fin will have to sell, to make the first years fees. The rest he'll have to sing for :)

 

 

Edited by Pasanda

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The fees are just for tuition for 1 year. Does not include books, room and board,  or any meals or any other ancillary expenses. 

Degrees take a minimum of four years, so for Ohio State, total tuition would be north of $40k. That's the cheapest option.  Unless you go for 2 years of community college.

I opened a 529 account before they were born and have been making monthly contributions. 

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1 hour ago, Dunnar said:

The fees are just for tuition for 1 year. Does not include books, room and board,  or any meals or any other ancillary expenses. 

Degrees take a minimum of four years, so for Ohio State, total tuition would be north of $40k. That's the cheapest option.  Unless you go for 2 years of community college.

I opened a 529 account before they were born and have been making monthly contributions. 

So.... (and i'm asking for professional reasons too)... would a British degree, at $5k less, be of any interest or value to you and your peers.

Our Vice Chancellor (if you don't have similar roles, that's the equivalent of a company's CEO) recently asked why our University hadn't targeted one of the biggest markets in the world; that of the US market. I don't have the first clue.

 

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46 minutes ago, Pasanda said:

So.... (and i'm asking for professional reasons too)... would a British degree, at $5k less, be of any interest or value to you and your peers.

Our Vice Chancellor (if you don't have similar roles, that's the equivalent of a company's CEO) recently asked why our University hadn't targeted one of the biggest markets in the world; that of the US market. I don't have the first clue.

 

From a cost perspective, it would be tough to justify. Let's say tuition, books, room and board are equal. Travel costs would blow the budget. 

I can drive to Ohio State. Cost in $ is low and cost in time is a few hours.

Also factor in the parents appetite for distance. Cincinnati, at 5 hours by car, was too far for my wife. 

Absent some cost that I'm not figuring in, it would be tough to compete with local state schools.  Private schools might be competitive.

Your school give diversity scholarships to Americans? :D

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On 10/22/2018 at 4:09 AM, Dunnar said:

October is a great time to drive around the state as we enjoyed the crisp Autumn days.

So in other words ... Humpty Dumpty had a great Fall.

:D

 

On 10/22/2018 at 10:21 AM, Dunnar said:

For instance, Ohio State is roughly $10k in-state and $27k for out of state. 

For comparison purposes, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF - a world premier arctic research institution) costs ~$5,600 tuition and fees in state, and ~$17,300 out of state tuition and fees (data from 2015-16, probably slightly higher today). Consider spending a single year with out of state tuition, then file for residency to get in state rate plus eligibility for the state's annual PFD (currently capped at ~$1600) which can be used to further reduce college costs.  Alaska also has the lowest taxes in the nation - no state sales or income tax.  Consider the upfront cost of the first year of education as an investment in savings for the following years ... and an opportunity for the rest of the family to vacation in the great outdoors participating in activities only available in Alaska.  / wink wink nudge nudge say no more

 

Edited by Elovia

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23 hours ago, Pasanda said:

just to clarify, all those costs are annual fees right? So a degree is typically 3 times the figure you cite, right? 

For info, pretty much all degrees (except Oxbridge and private universities) are £9k per annum and most degrees are 3 years long. So £27k is what most families can expect to pay for their kids fees to get a degree. That around $35k.

I have a pile of antiques in my attic that Fin will have to sell, to make the first years fees. The rest he'll have to sing for :)

 

 

When I did it it was just £1k a year, and that was still relatively new. University is just not going to be an option for people like my niece now.

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3 hours ago, Jazz said:

When I did it it was just £1k a year, and that was still relatively new. University is just not going to be an option for people like my niece now.

When you did it, the local currency was Guineas and Groats.

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10 hours ago, Elovia said:

Consider the upfront cost of the first year of education as an investment in savings for the following years ... and an opportunity for the rest of the family to vacation in the great outdoors participating in activities only available in Alaska.  / wink wink nudge nudge say no more

Humm, now that's an interesting option 

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2 hours ago, Pasanda said:

When you did it, the local currency was Guineas and Groats.

When I was at uni we were doing well if we had a single groat to our name! Damn youngsters!

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4 hours ago, Dunnar said:

Humm, now that's an interesting option 

Following my recent US sojourn, i suspect that the UK is cheaper to live in than the US. Except perhaps for property and fuel.

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